…and then?!

On 25 March EU will celebrate the 60th anniversary of the signing of the Treaties of Rome. On that day, to celebrate together the beginning of a long journey at the Orazi and Curiazi Hall of the Capitol, the very place where the Treaties were signed in 1957. This will be an opportunity to reflect on the state of the European Union and the future of the integration process.

First, this will be an opportunity to celebrate European history together and take stock of sixty years of integration. It is no secret that the historical moment we are facing requires deeper and more solid reflection on the challenges for the Union in the short and medium term: we refer to internal and external security (with particular reference to migration), to growth and employment and to social development. After the celebratory session, we intend to adopt a political declaration reaffirming the validity of the European integration project, and setting out a joint vision for the years to come.

The leaders of 27 member states and of EU institutions will adopt a political declaration in Rome, reaffirming their commitment to continue to work together within the European Union. The declaration will look back at achievements over the last 60 years, set out a number challenges and offer a joint vision for the years to come. Leaders are expected to commit themselves to a ‘Rome Agenda’ pledging to work for
1) a safe and secure Europe,
2) a prosperous and sustainable Europe,
3) a social Europe,
4) a stronger Europe on the global scene.

***

 

60th anniversary of the Rome Treaties
25 March 2017 in Rome, Italy
BACKGROUND

Brussels, 23 March 2017 – On 25 March, exactly 60 years after the signing of the Rome Treaties, the 27 EU heads of state or government and heads of European Union institutions will meet in Rome to celebrate the anniversary. The leaders will look back at the achievements of the last 60 years, reaffirm their unity, their common interests and values, as well as reflect on the current challenges and set the priorities for the next ten years. The leaders are expected to issue the Rome Declaration.

The celebrations will start at 10.00 in the Orazi and Curiazi Hall [Pictures] of the Capitol [Piazza del Campidoglio] + [Turkish], the same venue as in 1957 when the Treaties were signed. There will be speeches by Italian Prime Minister Gentiloni, European Parliament President Tajani, European Council President Tusk, Maltese Prime Minister Muscat and European Commission President Juncker. The commemoration will be live streamed.

This will be followed by a family photo in the courtyard, cortile di Michelangelo, [Cortile del Belvedere] at 11.50, before the five speakers (above) will return to the Orazi and Curiazi Hall of the Capitol for a press conference at 12.00.

At 13.00 the Italian President Mattarella will host a lunch at the Palazzo del Quirinale for the participating heads of state or government and the heads of the European Union institutions. At the end of the lunch there will be another family photo.

In the margins of the celebrations, at 15.30 on Friday 24 March, there will be an extraordinary meeting between the European social partners and the European institutions at Palazzo Chigi. The EU institutions will be represented by Presidents Tusk and Juncker together with Prime Ministers Gentiloni, Muscat, Ratas, and Löfven. The social partners will be represented by their Presidents and Secretary-Generals.

On Friday evening at 18.00 EU heads of state or government and EU Presidents will have an audience with Pope Francis, which will include speeches by Prime Minister Gentiloni, President Tajani and Pope Francis.

 

Rome declaration

The leaders of 27 member states and of EU institutions will adopt a political declaration in Rome, reaffirming their commitment to continue to work together within the European Union. The declaration will look back at achievements over the last 60 years, set out a number challenges and offer a joint vision for the years to come. Leaders are expected to commit themselves to a ‘Rome Agenda’ pledging to work for

1) a safe and secure Europe,

2) a prosperous and sustainable Europe,

3) a social Europe, and

4) a stronger Europe on the global scene.

Preparations for the declaration and the 60th anniversary of the Rome Treaties

The EU27 leaders have met twice to discuss the content of the Rome declaration and to prepare for the 60th anniversary of the Rome Treaties; once in Brussels on Friday 10 March and once in Malta on 3 February 2017. The discussions among leaders also built upon the political reflection on the future of the EU with 27 member states, launched immediately after the UK voted to leave the European Union on 23 June 2016 and continued in Bratislava on 16 September 2016.

§ [Remarks by President Donald Tusk after the informal meeting of the 27 heads of state or government, 10 March 2017]

§ [Informal meeting of EU heads of state or government in Malta, 3 February 2017]

§ [Political reflection on the future of the EU]

60 years of the EU

Sixty years ago in Rome, the foundations were laid for the Europe that we know today. It has led to the longest period of peace in written history in Europe. The Treaties of Rome established a common market where people, goods, services and capital can move freely and created the conditions for prosperity and stability for European citizens.

§ 60 years of the Rome Treaties [official website]

§ History of the EU [Timeline]

The Rome Treaties

Treaties of Rome were the founding treaties establishing the European Economic Community (EEC) and the European Atomic Energy Community (EAEC), which were signed on 25 March 1957 and entered into force on 1 January 1958.

With institutional structures similar to that of the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC), the new communities also comprised four institutions: a Commission, a Council and, shared jointly with the ECSC, an Assembly and a Court.

The first meeting of the Council of the EEC took place on 25 January 1958 under the chairmanship of Victor Larock, the Belgian Foreign Affairs Minister.

§ Treaty establishing the European Economic Community [Treaty]

§ Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community [Euratom]

§ The European Council and the Council of the EU through time [Publication:]

§ Europe through the generations [Film:]

§ From fireside chats to key decision maker: a history of the European Council [Film:]

List of guests to the events on 25 March
European Union Institutions

1. President of the European Council -Donald Tusk
2. President of the European Commission -Jean-Claude Juncker
3. President of the European Parliament -Antonio Tajani
4. President of the Court of Justice of the European Union – Koen Lenaerts
5. President of the European Court of Auditors – Klaus-Heiner Lehne
6. President of the European Central Bank – Mario Draghi
7. President of the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) – Georges Dassis
8. President of the European Committee of the Regions (CoR) – Markku Markkula
9. High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy – Federica Mogherini
10. President of the European Investment Bank (EIB) – Werner Hoyer
11. European Ombudsman – Emily O’Reilly
12.European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) – Giovanni Buttarelli
European Union Member States
1. Austria – Federal Chancellor – Christian Kern
2. Belgium –Prime Minister – Charles Michel
3. Bulgaria – Prime Minister – Ognyan Gerdzhikov
4. Cyprus – President -Nikos Anastasiades
5. Croatia – Prime Minister – Andrej Plenković
6. Czech Republic – Prime Minister -Bohuslav Sobotka
7. Denmark – Prime Minister – Lars Løkke Rasmussen
8. Estonia – Prime Minister – Jüri Ratas
9. Finland – Prime Minister – Juha Sipilä
10. France – President – François Hollande
11. Germany – Federal Chancellor – Angela Merkel
12. Greece – Prime Minister – Alexis Tsipras
13. Hungary – Prime Minister – Viktor Orbán
14. Ireland – The Taoiseach – Enda Kenny
15. Italy – Prime Minister – Paolo Gentiloni
16. Latvia – Prime Minister – Māris Kučinskis
17. Lithuania – President – Dalia Grybauskaitė
18. Luxembourg – Prime Minister – Xavier Bettel
19. Malta – Prime Minister – Joseph Muscat
20. The Netherlands – Prime Minister – Mark Rutte
21. Poland – Prime Minister – Beata Szydło
22. Portugal – Prime Minister – António Costa
23. Romania –President – Klaus Werner Iohannis
24. Slovakia – Prime Minister – Robert Fico
25. Slovenia – Prime Minister – Miro Cerar
26. Spain – Prime Minister – Mariano Rajoy
27. Sweden – Prime Minister – Stefan Löfven

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